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  • Central High School
    Principal: Jon Flynn
    1120 Main Street
    Davenport, Iowa 52803
    Phone: (563) 723-5400
    Fax: (563) 445-5952

  • 2009 Induction Poem

     

    Making Waves

     

    Randy Wayne White made a splash at Central: varsity letter winner

    as both catcher and diver, student council president, and Spree King,

    while he as a writer made a quieter start, on a bench in Vander Veer Park,

    scribbling thoughts.  An athlete, whose love of language would land him

    on The New York Times Bestseller List, he first reported for the Blackhawk,

    then the Fort Meyers News-Press before launching life as a light tackle

    fishing guide and novelist at Tarpon Bay Marina on Sanibel Island, Florida.

    Named best look-alike for Papa Hemingway, he risked taking a load

    of baseball equipment to Havana to restart Papa’s Little League team.

    Randy writes 1000 words a day, many about marine biologist Doc Ford

    and his pals at Dinkin’s Bay. He makes chili sauce at Doc Ford’s Tropical Bar

    as hot as his newest novel and his oldest love for Central.

     

    When the DHS audience of May 17, 1935, read the program

    for the senior class production of It’s Love, I Realize,

    they discovered someone: “Music and Lyrics Composed,

    Arranged, and Directed by Perry Lafferty.” Though his splash

    was dramatic, who would have thought he’d go on to Hollywood

    to produce All in the Family and Mash?  Programming radio before TV,

    network executive Perry rose through the ranks at CBS to success

    and controversy. All in the Family confronted racism and drugs,

    while his Emmy-winner, An Early Frost, treated the hot AIDS topic,

    but the censors’ cold blows struck The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.

    Once called a “hip father confessor,” Perry Lafferty won

    high praise for his talent, taste, and good humor.

     

    When Patti Manus saw a need, she filled it courageously

    with love and commitment.  After her daughter Robin was born

    with developmental disabilities, she dove undaunted into

    the educational void to found her School of Hope in Hope, Arkansas.

    She started with only six children. After four decades of her lobbying,

    furious grant writing, and countless meetings, Patti’s school now provides

    for infants through adults, even at satellite centers. Going beyond

    learning needs, Patti championed assisted living apartments

    for adults with disabilities, and her latest success is building Robin

    her own house, a symbol of hope for “almost independence.”

    The splash of her personal crusade sends endless ripples

    out into an ever-widening community of caring.

     

     

     

     

    Dick Stahl and Nancy Hayes